WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT CANNABINOIDS AND SKIN CANCER

There is considerable research on the role cannabinoids can play in the treatment of skin cancer. Consistent findings include that both healthy skin tissue and skin tumors express cannabinoid receptors. Activation of these receptors induce the regression of skin tumors whether through direct apoptosis of cancer cells (self-destruction) or the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, which is the process by which new blood vessels grow from existing ones, a fundamental step for benign tumors becoming malignant ones. Just as cannabinoid receptors have been found to exist in melanoma cells, melanoma cells also have been found to produce cannabinoids (as well as other bioactive lipids), via the arachidonic acid metabolizing enzymes they express. These cannabinoids, in turn, act on our cells’ CB1 and CB2 receptors. (1)

Given that the growth and development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors seem to rely on an early burst of neovascularization (2) and that melanoma cells demonstrate a resistance to apoptosis, which makes chemotherapies often ineffective (3), findings demonstrating cannabinoids apoptotic and anti-angiogenetic properties hold promise for the treating of skin cancer.

Though CB2 receptors have been found to exist in normal human skin and in malignant melanoma, the expression of CB2 receptors is significantly higher in malignant melanoma than healthy skin tissues. (4) Researchers have also looked at the expression of CB2 in sarcoidosis and granuloma annulare, other diseases of the skin. They found that the expression of CB2 was lower in normal tissue than in those diseases, just as they found when comparing normal tissue to malignant melanoma. They concluded that it “may be interred that intensive expression of CB2 in these diseases was related to higher cellular proliferation tendency and aggregation in tissues”and that “CB2 receptor agonists can play an inhibitive role in the origin and development of non-infectious granulomatous disease and tumors by immune regulation.” (5)

In other words, disease and high expression of CB2 receptor was correlated and stimulating activity at the CB2 receptor could generate anti-cancer activity.

Researchers have also experimented with the CB1 receptor, which is the cannabinoid receptor that when stimulated can generate psychoactive results. A group of researchers from the National Institute of Oncology in Budapest, Hungary reported that two synthetic cannabinoids, one that stimulated the CB1 receptor and one that inhibited it, (Met-F-AEA and AM251, respectably) both inhibited proliferation of human melanoma cells in lab studies. In fact, CB1 antagonist, AM251, induced massive apoptosis (up to 50%) of human melanoma cell lines. (6)

Another study indicated the role of cannabinoids and the CB1 receptor in inhibiting the migration of melanoma cells to other organs, in addition to the anti-cancer properties mentioned above (promoting apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis). In this 2012 mouse study, researchers found that the systemic administration of the synthetic cannabinoid and CB1 agonist, ACEA, “specifically inhibited liver colonization of human melanoma cells.” (7)

Thus, the three hallmarks of the anti-cancer properties of cannabinoids – decreased proliferation and vascularization, increased apoptosis of tumor cells, and inhibition of tumor cell metastatic spreading – have all been demonstrated in skin cancer whether in lab studies, mouse studies, or both. Studies also indicate that cannabinoids create these effects on cancer cells without negatively impacting healthy ones. of skin cancer than the incidence of breast, prostate, lung an

There is considerable research on the role cannabinoids can play in the treatment of skin cancer. Consistent findings include that both healthy skin tissue and skin tumors express cannabinoid receptors. Activation of these receptors induce the regression of skin tumors whether through direct apoptosis of cancer cells (self-destruction) or the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, which is the process by which new blood vessels grow from existing ones, a fundamental step for benign tumors becoming malignant ones. Just as cannabinoid receptors have been found to exist in melanoma cells, melanoma cells also have been found to produce cannabinoids (as well as other bioactive lipids), via the arachidonic acid metabolizing enzymes they express. These cannabinoids, in turn, act on our cells’ CB1 and CB2 receptors. (1)

Given that the growth and development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors seem to rely on an early burst of neovascularization (2) and that melanoma cells demonstrate a resistance to apoptosis, which makes chemotherapies often ineffective (3), findings demonstrating cannabinoids apoptotic and anti-angiogenetic properties hold promise for the treating of skin cancer.

Though CB2 receptors have been found to exist in normal human skin and in malignant melanoma, the expression of CB2 receptors is significantly higher in malignant melanoma than healthy skin tissues. (4) Researchers have also looked at the expression of CB2 in sarcoidosis and granuloma annulare, other diseases of the skin. They found that the expression of CB2 was lower in normal tissue than in those diseases, just as they found when comparing normal tissue to malignant melanoma. They concluded that it “may be interred that intensive expression of CB2 in these diseases was related to higher cellular proliferation tendency and aggregation in tissues”and that “CB2 receptor agonists can play an inhibitive role in the origin and development of non-infectious granulomatous disease and tumors by immune regulation.” (5)

In other words, disease and high expression of CB2 receptor was correlated and stimulating activity at the CB2 receptor could generate anti-cancer activity.

Researchers have also experimented with the CB1 receptor, which is the cannabinoid receptor that when stimulated can generate psychoactive results. A group of researchers from the National Institute of Oncology in Budapest, Hungary reported that two synthetic cannabinoids, one that stimulated the CB1 receptor and one that inhibited it, (Met-F-AEA and AM251, respectably) both inhibited proliferation of human melanoma cells in lab studies. In fact, CB1 antagonist, AM251, induced massive apoptosis (up to 50%) of human melanoma cell lines. (6)

Another study indicated the role of cannabinoids and the CB1 receptor in inhibiting the migration of melanoma cells to other organs, in addition to the anti-cancer properties mentioned above (promoting apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis). In this 2012 mouse study, researchers found that the systemic administration of the synthetic cannabinoid and CB1 agonist, ACEA, “specifically inhibited liver colonization of human melanoma cells.” (7)

Thus, the three hallmarks of the anti-cancer properties of cannabinoids – decreased proliferation and vascularization, increased apoptosis of tumor cells, and inhibition of tumor cell metastatic spreading – have all been demonstrated in skin cancer whether in lab studies, mouse studies, or both. Studies also indicate that cannabinoids create these effects on cancer cells without negatively impacting healthy ones.KIN CANCER AWARENESS MONTH: WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT CANNABINOIDS AND SKIN CANCER

According to skincancer.org, nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer in the U.S. each year, a number which constitutes more cases of skin cancer than the incidence of breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer combined.

There is considerable research on the role cannabinoids can play in the treatment of skin cancer. Consistent findings include that both healthy skin tissue and skin tumors express cannabinoid receptors. Activation of these receptors induce the regression of skin tumors whether through direct apoptosis of cancer cells (self-destruction) or the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, which is the process by which new blood vessels grow from existing ones, a fundamental step for benign tumors becoming malignant ones. Just as cannabinoid receptors have been found to exist in melanoma cells, melanoma cells also have been found to produce cannabinoids (as well as other bioactive lipids), via the arachidonic acid metabolizing enzymes they express. These cannabinoids, in turn, act on our cells’ CB1 and CB2 receptors. (1)

Given that the growth and development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors seem to rely on an early burst of neovascularization (2) and that melanoma cells demonstrate a resistance to apoptosis, which makes chemotherapies often ineffective (3), findings demonstrating cannabinoids apoptotic and anti-angiogenetic properties hold promise for the treating of skin cancer.

Though CB2 receptors have been found to exist in normal human skin and in malignant melanoma, the expression of CB2 receptors is significantly higher in malignant melanoma than healthy skin tissues. (4) Researchers have also looked at the expression of CB2 in sarcoidosis and granuloma annulare, other diseases of the skin. They found that the expression of CB2 was lower in normal tissue than in those diseases, just as they found when comparing normal tissue to malignant melanoma. They concluded that it “may be interred that intensive expression of CB2 in these diseases was related to higher cellular proliferation tendency and aggregation in tissues”and that “CB2 receptor agonists can play an inhibitive role in the origin and development of non-infectious granulomatous disease and tumors by immune regulation.” (5)

In other words, disease and high expression of CB2 receptor was correlated and stimulating activity at the CB2 receptor could generate anti-cancer activity.

Researchers have also experimented with the CB1 receptor, which is the cannabinoid receptor that when stimulated can generate psychoactive results. A group of researchers from the National Institute of Oncology in Budapest, Hungary reported that two synthetic cannabinoids, one that stimulated the CB1 receptor and one that inhibited it, (Met-F-AEA and AM251, respectably) both inhibited proliferation of human melanoma cells in lab studies. In fact, CB1 antagonist, AM251, induced massive apoptosis (up to 50%) of human melanoma cell lines. (6)

Another study indicated the role of cannabinoids and the CB1 receptor in inhibiting the migration of melanoma cells to other organs, in addition to the anti-cancer properties mentioned above (promoting apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis). In this 2012 mouse study, researchers found that the systemic administration of the synthetic cannabinoid and CB1 agonist, ACEA, “specifically inhibited liver colonization of human melanoma cells.” (7)

Thus, the three hallmarks of the anti-cancer properties of cannabinoids – decreased proliferation and vascularization, increased apoptosis of tumor cells, and inhibition of tumor cell metastatic spreading – have all been demonstrated in skin cancer whether in lab studies, mouse studies, or both. Studies also indicate that cannabinoids create these effects on cancer cells without negatively impacting healthy ones. of skin cancer than the incidence of breast, prostate, lung an

There is consicderable research on the role cannabinoids can play in the treatment of skin cancer. Consistent findings include that both healthy skin tissue and skin tumors express cannabinoid receptors. Activation of these receptors induce the regression of skin tumors whether through direct apoptosis of cancer cells (self-destruction) or the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, which is the process by which new blood vessels grow from existing ones, a fundamental step for benign tumors becoming malignant ones. Just as cannabinoid receptors have been found to exist in melanoma cells, melanoma cells also have been found to produce cannabinoids (as well as other bioactive lipids), via the arachidonic acid metabolizing enzymes they express. These cannabinoids, in turn, act on our cells’ CB1 and CB2 receptors. (1)

Given that the growth and development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors seem to rely on an early burst of neovascularization (2) and that melanoma cells demonstrate a resistance to apoptosis, which makes chemotherapies often ineffective (3), findings demonstrating cannabinoids apoptotic and anti-angiogenetic properties hold promise for the treating of skin cancer.

Though CB2 receptors have been found to exist in normal human skin and in malignant melanoma, the expression of CB2 receptors is significantly higher in malignant melanoma than healthy skin tissues. (4) Researchers have also looked at the expression of CB2 in sarcoidosis and granuloma annulare, other diseases of the skin. They found that the expression of CB2 was lower in normal tissue than in those diseases, just as they found when comparing normal tissue to malignant melanoma. They concluded that it “may be interred that intensive expression of CB2 in these diseases was related to higher cellular proliferation tendency and aggregation in tissues”and that “CB2 receptor agonists can play an inhibitive role in the origin and development of non-infectious granulomatous disease and tumors by immune regulation.” (5)

In other words, disease and high expression of CB2 receptor was correlated and stimulating activity at the CB2 receptor could generate anti-cancer activity.

Researchers have also experimented with the CB1 receptor, which is the cannabinoid receptor that when stimulated can generate psychoactive results. A group of researchers from the National Institute of Oncology in Budapest, Hungary reported that two synthetic cannabinoids, one that stimulated the CB1 receptor and one that inhibited it, (Met-F-AEA and AM251, respectably) both inhibited proliferation of human melanoma cells in lab studies. In fact, CB1 antagonist, AM251, induced massive apoptosis (up to 50%) of human melanoma cell lines. (6)

Another study indicated the role of cannabinoids and the CB1 receptor in inhibiting the migration of melanoma cells to other organs, in addition to the anti-cancer properties mentioned above (promoting apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis). In this 2012 mouse study, researchers found that the systemic administration of the synthetic cannabinoid and CB1 agonist, ACEA, “specifically inhibited liver colonization of human melanoma cells.” (7)

Thus, the three hallmarks of the anti-cancer properties of cannabinoids – decreased proliferation and vascularization, increased apoptosis of tumor cells, and inhibition of tumor cell metastatic spreading – have all been demonstrated in skin cancer whether in lab studies, mouse studies, or both. Studies also indicate that cannabinoids create these effects on cancer cells without negatively impacting healthy ones.

Source : K.M. CHOLEWA
http://www.kmcholewa.com

Green Juice

 

With the home juicing phenomenon taking over kitchens across the world, it’s not uncommon to find someone enjoying a green, vegetable-infused smoothie for breakfast in the comfort of their own home. However, the term “green” is starting to take on a whole new meaning as marijuana enthusiasts explore the benefits of juicing a different kind of plant.

More and more individuals are infusing their drinks with a blend of fan leaves and flowers of raw, undried cannabis. Here are four reasons why.

1. Avoid Experiencing the High

Although many people consume cannabis in order to feel a high, some marijuana mavens prefer the taste and health benefits associated with the plant. Those consumers who want to avoid the euphoria associated with THC but enjoy the health benefits of the plant can use marijuana in their juicers instead. When cannabis is heated—such as when it’s consumed using either a vaporizer, joint or bong—the acids stored in the plant are converted to cannabinoids, which include the psychoactive element THC. However, because the cannabis remains cool as a cucumber(or any other vegetables you decide to mix in with it) when juiced, juicers can enjoy their concoctions without having to worry about experiencing a high.

2. Ability to Up Your Doses

Because marijuana’s psychoactive elements are more potent when heated, individuals looking to consume larger amounts of cannabis are better served to try it in its raw form. According to cannabis juicing proponent and founder of the Cannabis International Foundation Dr. William Courtney, THC can be taken in doses of hundreds of milligrams when raw. However, once heated, the tolerable dose drops to 10 mg a day. By ingesting it raw, he says juicers can better experience the plant’s medicinal benefits, such as pain and nausea relief.

3. No Need for Smoking

For those concerned about inhaling smoke but who still want to enjoy the taste or health benefits of marijuana, juicing provides a no-smoke option. While smoking cannabis has not been linked to lung cancer, it has been linked to irritation and minor respiratory symptoms, so resorting to juicing may help concerned consumers breathe easier—both literally and figuratively.

be juiced alongside other vegetables or fruits, it opens up a world of possibilities for the cannabis connoisseur. Whether it’s marijuana and watermelon juice or cannabis-carrot mocktails, the world is your oyster! Juicing also makes it easier to ingest cannabis in places where you might otherwise be unable to smoke a joint or use a vaporizer.

Tips and Tricks

With these benefits in mind, here are some key tips for ensuring success in your green juicing endeavors:

The fresher the better: As with any vegetables, using fresh ingredients in your juicer will make for a healthier, more effective blend. Avoid using dried cannabis that has been prepared for smoking.

Raw is right: Make sure your buds are harvested when the THC glands are clear, not cloudy or amber, to ensure you’re receiving all the possible health benefits.

Balance with veggies: In order to cut through the bitter flavor of raw cannabis, mix in other strong-tasting vegetables, such as carrots.

Use a wheatgrass juicer: If you can get your hands on one, a wheatgrass juicer is recommended for those blending large quantities of cannabis. Bud-juicing proponents say it’s quicker, easier to clean, and you recover a higher percentage of the ingredients you set out to blend.

Although the health benefits are seemingly vast, cannabis juicers currently face the challenge of finding enough raw plant material to juice on a daily basis. According to Dr. Courtney, patients should be consuming 15-20 large fan leaves and a couple of buds per day. Unless you live in a state where medical marijuana is legal or where you can cultivate your own plants (and lots of them), the new green juice may have to remain an occasional treat for cannabis lovers—at least for now.

Source : Hemp Juice Lady

CHERRY PIE WITH HEMP SEED & WALNUTS

INGREDIENTS:
Crust
1 cup walnuts
1 cup hemp seeds
1/6 cup coconut oil
1/8 cup preferred liquid sweetener (maple syrup, agave nectar, coconut nectar, date syrup, etc.)
Filling
1-2 cups fresh organic pitted cherries

METHOD :
Pulse the walnuts and hemp seeds into powder in your food processor.
Add the coconut oil and sweetener and process until it forms a ball.
Press 2/3 of this dough into a small pie dish (I just used a 4-inch spring form pan) and put in the fridge for 2-3 hours to set.
Roll out the remaining dough between two sheets of parchment paper then stick in the freezer until hardened, about 1-2 hours.
Once your rolled out dough is hard, cut it into strips and carefully create a lattice crust on parchment paper.
But don’t flip back the strips as you’re making it, simply slide the strips under each other.
Fill your pie crust with cherries then gently transfer your lattice crust on top of the pie, rip off the excess strips, and press the edges together.
Serve right away or put back in the fridge for another hour or so.
This is best eaten the same day it’s made.
Enjoy

Cannabis & Anxiety

 

Anxiety and Cannabis have a complicated relationship, but different types of cannabis may play a role.

Many people who use marijuana say that it helps relieve anxiety. On the other hand, there are just as many who report feeling more anxious after using marijuana. Although the exact details remain a mystery, a possible explanation may lie in the specific chemical make-up of cannabis.

As most marijuana users are aware, not all cannabis is the same. There are a wide range of strains available, and many are believed to have unique effects on their user.

What makes strains unique from one another is their active ingredients, also known as cannabinoids. Although clinical research is lacking, knowing the differences between strains and how they affect anxiety can be helpful.

THC vs. CBD

The two most common chemicals in cannabis are THC and CBD. Although most strains contain both compounds, levels of THC and CBD tend to vary from strain to strain. Interestingly, research shows that THC and CBD can have opposite effects on anxiety.

THC is responsible for the marijuana high and is also strongly linked to feelings of paranoia, especially when taken in high doses. This is because THC activatesan area of the brain responsible for fear — the amygdala.

CBD, on the other hand, is believed to counteract the mind-altering effects of THC. What’s more, studies have shown that when taken on its own CBD can lower anxiety in both healthy and anxiety-prone individuals.

Types of Cannabis

The reason why marijuana is often associated with anxiety may be because most plants are bred to be rich in THC. The way CBD and THC are producedwithin the plant causes strains with high THC to have less CBD (and vice versa).

High CBD strains have only recently become popular, due in part to growing awareness of the compound’s medical effects. As a result, there’s a strong chance that any marijuana you obtain will have more THC than CBD.

Other components in cannabis may also contribute to its effect on anxiety. Besides THC and CBD, cannabis contains over 60 different cannabinoids along with a variety of aromatic compounds known as terpenes.

Certain terpenes in cannabis have been found to possess anti-anxiety properties. Still, most of these chemicals are only present in trace amounts and little is known about their overall impact on marijuana users.

Avoiding Anxiety

Overcoming anxiety from cannabis could be as simple as reducing the amount of THC that you ingest. In fact, some studies suggest that THC at low doses can have an anti-anxiety effect.

Research conducted in animals shows that THC begins to raise anxiety levels only after a certain threshold is passed. Although it’s hard to predict what your threshold might be, people who use cannabis frequently tend to have a higher threshold. This is because of the desensitization to marijuana, or tolerance, that develops.

For those specifically looking to treat anxiety disorders with cannabis, the best bet may be to find strains with high CBD content. A breakdown of a strain’s THC and CBD content is often provided where the sale of cannabis is regulated.

Source : Leaf Science

Hemp Tropical Papaya Fruit Salad

Ingredients :

1 ripe papaya or cantaloupe, halved, seeds removed
1 cup Banana Ice Cream or Flavored Dairy-free Yogurt (I love blueberry coconut yogurt from Trader Joe’s)
1 kiwi, skin removed and chopped
1/2 cup cherries, pitted and halved
1/4 cup blueberries
2-3 Tbsp slivered almonds
1 Tbsp chia seeds
1/2 Tbsp hemp seeds
Granola (see all of my granola recipes)
Method :
To make banana ice cream (instead of using dairy-free yogurt), add 2 ripe, previously sliced and frozen bananas to a blender or food processor and blend on low until a creamy ice cream consistency is reached. Scrape down sides as needed, and add a splash of almond milk if it has trouble blending.
To assemble papaya (or cantaloupe) boats, simply fill the hollow centers with desired amounts of banana ice cream or coconut yogurt, fruit, nuts and seeds!
Enjoy immediately – best when fresh.

Enjoy

Kale Hemp fruit Smoothie

Ingredients :
1 medium ripe banana (previously peeled, sliced and frozen (~3/4 cup)
1/2 cup frozen mixed berries (or sub blueberries)
1 heaping Tbsp hulled hemp seeds
2 cups frozen or fresh kale, any kind
2/3 cup 100% pomegranate juice
3/4 – 1 1/2 cups filtered water
Method :
Add all ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth, adding more water as needed. Taste and adjust flavors as needed. Add more banana or agave for some added sweetness.
Serve immediately

enjoy

Cannabis Extract Fights ‘Incurable Form’ of Leukemia

 

A remarkable case report documents a 14-year old girl who, after 34-months of chemo, radiation and bone marrow transplant treatments, was given up for dead. Her family discovered research on cannabis extract, and before she died of a secondary complication of her original treatment, used it successfully to put her leukemia into remission.

There are plenty of anecdotal reports of the successful use of cannabis in treating cancer, but few cases occur under conventional medical supervision, and virtually none make it into a peer-reviewed biomedical journal as a case report.

Remarkably, however, just such a case was reported in Case Reports in Oncology last year, and involved a 14-year girl diagnosed with a form of cancer of the white blood cells known as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

Despite a high remission rate for ALL after 5 year of 94% in children and 30-40% in adults using conventional combination chemotherapy, this particular child was diagnosed with a very aggressive (i.e. conventional treatment resistant) form of ALL (positive for the Philadelphia chromosome mutation).

After undergoing a protracted series of unsuccessful conventional treatments over the course of 34 months – including a bone marrow transplant, aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy — the girl’s case was pronounced ‘incurable,’ with the patient’s hematologist/oncologist stating that she “suffers from terminal malignant disease,” expecting her condition to progress rapidly towards death.

Because the family received no other suggestions for treatment beyond palliative care, they decided to do research on their own, stumbling on a paper published in Nature Reviews: Cancer in 2003 titled, “Cannibinoids: Potential Anti-Cancer Agents,” which encouraged them to administer oral cannabinoid extracts to the patient. According to the case report:

“The family found promise in an organization known as Phoenix Tears, led by Rick Simpson who had treated several cancers with hemp oil, an extract from the cannabis plant. Rick worked with the family to help them prepare the extract.

With Rick Simpson’s assistance, the family used cannabis oil extract for the next 78 days, with regular monitoring of the blast cell count, the primary indicator of the malignant progression of the disease process.

The figure below shows the successful suppression of the blast cells using cannabis extract.

early, the cannabis extract was effective at inhibiting the uncontrolled proliferation of the girl’s leukemia, without the highly toxic side effects of conventional treatment.

Sadly, however, on day 78, the 14-year old passed away as a consequence of bleeding associated with bowel perforation, and ultimately the lasting adverse effects of the original 34 months of aggressive treatment she had underwent previous to cannabis.

In the discussion portion of the case report, the authors noted,

“The results shown here cannot be attributed to the phenomenon of ‘spontaneous remission’ because a dose response curve was achieved… These results cannot be explained by any other therapies, as the child was under palliative care and was solely on cannabinoid treatment when the response was documented by the SickKids Hospital. The toxicology reports ruled out chemotherapeutic agents, and only showed her to be positive for THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) when she had ‘a recent massive decrease of WBC from 350,000 to 0.3’ inducing tumor lysis syndrome, as reported by the primary hematologist/oncologist at the SickKids Hospital.”

The study authors believe this therapy should be viewed as “polytherapy,” owing to the fact that a wide range of cannabinoids have been found within resinous extract, which demonstrate a variety of anti-cancer properties, e.g. anti-angiogenic, anti-proliferative, etc. They further acknowledged the potential for the profound superiority of cannabinoid therapy to conventional treatments:

“It must be noted that where our most advanced chemotherapeutic agents had failed to control the blast counts and had devastating side effects that ultimately resulted in the death of the patient, the cannabinoid therapy had no toxic side effects and only psychosomatic properties, with an increase in the patient’s vitality.”

Source : Green Med Info

Hemp Seed Pumpkin Spice Pudding

 

Ingredients :

2 Tbsps Chia Seeds
2 Tbsps Hemp Seeds
1/4 cup Pure Pumpkin Puree
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
4 drops liquid Stevia (or to taste)
1 tsp unsweetened shredded coconut
1 tsp Pumpkin Pie Spice
1/2 cup of milk (I used soy – use what you’ve got)

Method :

Mix it all together in a bowl. Stir thoroughly and then stir once every few minutes until the Chia has gelled (about 10 minutes). Put in fridge to chill. Serve with toppings of choice.

Toppings of choice – I topped with high protein Greek yogurt, pecans, coconut and raisins. Just enough for a bit of crunch from the pecans and some natural sweetness from the raisins.

enjoy

Hemp Gold Tea

Ingredients:

1 cup of organic hemp milk ( or organic whole milk )
1 tsp hemp seeds
1 tsp Organic Ghee or coconut oil
¼ to ½ tsp of organic turmeric powder
Large pinch of ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg and cardamom powder
Small pinch of saffron (optional but highly recommended!)
Raw honey to taste
Spices listed can be replaced with 1/2 tsp of my Ayurvedic Breakfast Spices

Method :

Warm the milk in a small pan over low-medium heat, while stirring occasionally.
Once warm, slowly add the ghee and spices while continuing to stir. Mix until there are no chunks and the powder has fully absorbed into the milk. If you have a hand blender, this works particularly well and it also creates a yummy frothy texture.
Remove from the heat and let it cool to a drinkable temperature. Once the temp has cooled to about 110 degrees, add a small spoonful of honey to the desired sweetness. Top it off with a sprinkle of extra cinnamon.
enjoy!!