The future is Hemp

There are certain global changes, which we do not welcome. Deforestation, global warming, over population, loss of diversity, and the poisoning of seemingly every ecosystem alive.
We need to act now! Analyzing these problems and creating solutions should be our PRIORITY. Alternative crops such as hemp offer a wide range of benefits, not only to the environment but to local and world economies alike. Hemp is as valuable to the small farm communities as it is to the big industry (a balance not often found these days). The overall benefits include: bio-safe alternatives to the products depended upon now, and a sustainable fiber source to meet the worlds extreme demand. The benefits to the world would be phenomenal. Farmers worldwide could utilize this amazing universal plant. The key word here is adaptability. Hemp can thrive virtually anywhere in the world, due to the fact that it is essentially a weed.

Agriculturally, hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is a superb rotational crop. It also has the ability to resist drought as well as insects and fungus. Requiring little to no fertilizer it would greatly improve water quality by potentially reducing cancer causing agents in well water and runoff into rivers, lakes, and streams.

Economically, opportunity is knocking! The amount of jobs that would be created by the major upsurge in hemp production, would be a welcome blessing to small rural communities where jobs are scarce. Why are we sending millions of dollars each year to foreign economies when there are plenty of farmers as well as manufacturers and consumers right here in America? Prior to 1890 the world depended on hemp fiber so much it was the universal standard. In colonial times it was required by law to grow the hemp plant, for the survival of the colonies. You could pay your taxes with hemp. Both Thomas Jefferson and George Washington grew, and strongly advocated the hemp plant to stabilize our new country. Washington himself once said, “Make the most of the hemp plant – sow it everywhere.”

The pros most definitely outweigh the cons (if there are any). Hemp is not in production today because of laws written in 1937 by politicians involved in big industry. Cultivation of hemp posed a direct threat to the petrochemical industry, as well as cotton growers, and paper producers with large timber holdings. Therefore laws were designed to create so much red tape it would hinder and eventually stop production of the plant. Big industry does not want hemp relegalized, and they are the ones with the money and the lobbying power to maintain this red tape. By avoiding natural solutions, Industry continues to deplete our earth’s resources.

Propaganda was published nationwide in the Hearst Newspaper, the largest paper in the country, during the 1930’s. Enough people read or heard these lies that it has become incorporated into our culture to think of hemp as marijuana the “killer weed”. This is entirely untrue, and only through proper education can we counteract the effects of the “campaign of lies”.

Cannabis sativa L., otherwise known as hemp, contains less than one- percent (.2%) tetrahydracannabinol (THC), the active ingredient, which causes the “high” effect when smoking pot. This TRACE of THC would only be present in the leaves, and would be of no pharmaceutical value. Even if one were to try to smoke hemp they would only get a headache or become nauseous. You CANNOT get high on hemp! Hemp products DO NOT contain THC. It is perfectly legal to possess hemp products as well as sterilized seeds. You cannot cultivate it because law enforcement officials claim they could not distinguish between hemp and marijuana. This is also untrue. The two varieties of cannabis grow completely different. A field of hemp is planted in rows four inches apart, and is grown for its fibrous stalks. Hemp grows to a mature height of 10 to 12 feet; marijuana is a short, bushy plant, which grows to an average height of four to six feet. Additionally, smoking grade marijuana is planted two feet apart and grown for its potent flowers.

By using hemp products you are saying, “It’s time to make a change.” Bio-safe products need to become an everyday thing, not a trend. The earth is our life support system, and the only one we have. Let’s fix what has already been done. Please support Industrial Hemp, and pass on the truth to anyone who laughs, jokes, or just doesn’t know.

Written by: Travis Elble


Hemp Vs. Nuclear Waste

Have you heard of phytoremediation, or decontamination of soil? The combination of Ancient Greek “Phyto” or Plant with a bit of Latin “Remedium” to mean plants that clean or restore the balance of the soil and air. And guess which plant is the best at doing this? You got it. Hemp.

After the 1986 Chernobyl Disaster it was discovered that certain plants absorb radiation, heavy metals and other manmade toxins as part of their natural cycle. Hemp is rather unique because about 75% of the plant remains viable for safe production of many different products from the stalks and seed after it does a rather magnificent job cleaning up all sorts of nasty chemicals and toxins from the soil.

Hemp, the hero of Chernobyl

For over a decade, industrial hemp growing in proximity to the abandoned Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Pripyat, Ukraine has been helping to reduce soil toxicity. Slavik Dushenkov, a research scientist with Phytotech, one of the organisations behind the hemp plantings, stated that “hemp is proving to be one of the best phyto-remediative plants we have been able to find”.

In neighbouring Belarus, much of the rural land was contaminated, and authorities there are also pursuing the use of hemp in an attempt to clean up the soil. The harvest produced will be turned into ethanol; one added benefit of industrial hemp over other phytoremediation plants is that it can also be used to produce biofuel, potentially adding a second use for the crop after it removes toxins from the soil.

US imposed and outdated Cannabis Control Law affects Japan’s clean-up efforts

Following the devastating environmental damage caused by the Fukushima meltdown, Japan is considering using hemp to aid their clean up efforts. However, due to the Cannabis Control Law forced into Japanese law by the occupying U.S. powers in 1948, hemp may only be grown under license, which are highly restricted and difficult to obtain.

Hemp could potentially benefit hundreds of thousands of sites across the globe—it is estimated that in the USA alone there are 30,000 sites requiring remediation. And let’s not forget that the radioactive waste from the Fukushima disaster is now washing up on America and Canada’s west coast.

Hemp can help

In this video, Dr. Masaru Emoto talks about industrial hemp as a solution to the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, and may help provide some more answers to any lingering questions on why hemp is such a proven and valuable tool in the fight to repair human-inflicted damage to our soils and ecosystems.

“It is the suggestion to plant a lot of hemp in the land of Fukushima. Hemp is prohibited in almost all places in the world, but I am supporting the movement for hemp to revive….I think it has the…potentiality to purify the environment…I believe hemp fields will bring the eradication effect” – Dr. Masaru Emoto

Watch the full video below with English subtitles. Tell us your thoughts on the eradication effect hemp can bring to polluted soils and ecosystems on social media or in the comments section below.

Source : Herb

How Hemp Plastic Can Replace Plastic Products That Have A Negative Impact On The Environment

Hemp plastic is a bioplastic made by using industrial hemp, which is one of the strongest natural fibers known to man. There are a variety of hemp plastics manufactured today, from standard plastics reinforced with hemp fibres, to 100% biodegradable hemp plastics.

Hemp certainly is a versatile plant. Hemp seeds and protein powders are a valuable and nutritious food source, while the fibres can be made into textiles, ropes and a host of other products.

Hemp plastic is said to be five times stiffer and 2.5 times stronger than polypropylene (PP) plastic. It does not post the health and safety risks associated with certain plastics and it does not pollute the environment.

What can hemp plastic be used for?

The use of hemp in manufacturing is not new. As far back as 1941, Henry Ford used hemp-and-sisal cellulose plastic to build car doors and fenders, demonstrating that his hemp cars were stronger than steel-bodied cars, by hitting them with a sledgehammer.

These days, biogradable materials made from hemp and cornstarch can be injection or blow-molded into almost any shape using existing molds, the products of which include cosmetic containers, furniture, mobile phone cases, plastic bags, CD cases, children’s toys and numerous other applications. A hemp-plastic resin that was recently developed is used for musical instruments and loudspeakers.

Indeed, hemp plastic is the number one material of the future. Hemp grows easily and prolifically, making it an extremely efficient crop for these sustainable plastics known as bioplastics. They are lightweight, biodegradable and can replace many petrochemical plastics (oil-based plastics).

Much research still remains to be done to achieve the best sustainable alternatives to petroleum-based plastics. But nations throughout the world do realise that petrochemical usage needs to be reduced, and hemp is being recognised as a viable alternative to these plastics. Cost-effectiveness also needs to be addressed, especially since the hemp industry is tiny compared to the cotton, corn and sugar industries. (ethanol producing crops).

Sources:Medical Marijuana Update



One thing has become very clear over the past couple of years regarding the value of cow’s milk, particularly pasteurized, in our diets. And unfortunately, it’s not good news. A very seizable study came out late last year in the British Medical Journal which revealed a truth many of us had been speculating about (and perhaps fearing) for decades: Milk does not do a body good, and in fact contributes to a greater risk of mortality in men and women as well as bone fracture in women.

The search for palatable and sustainable alternatives to milk has been going on for years now, with more people becoming conscious of how their food is produced and what effect it has on their bodies. As we learn more about the practices involved in the unnatural mass production of milk, the choice to step away from purchasing cow’s milk is increasingly becoming an ethical one. The market shows this sentiment as well, as almond milk sales have soared to $700 million in 2015, up 40% over 2014. [2]

Hemp milk is another incredibly nutritious and tasty alternative to cow’s milk which supplies the body with essential nutrients without causing harm to the body like dairy milk does. Whatever the reason you are considering abstaining from from cow’s milk, hemp milk is one option you should consider. Here’s why.

Hemp milk is a vegan product made of a blend of hemp seeds and water. The mixture provides a creamy texture with a delicious, nutty taste. And unlike cow’s milk, hemp milk is easy for the body to digest.

Question number one for some of us might be: is hemp milk made from marijuana? The answer is, no. Hemp milk is made from the seeds of the hemp plant, which is legal to grow in various countries around the world. In fact, the United States is one of the only countries where you are not allowed to grow hemp. Possible concern some may have about hemp milk surrounds its levels of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Fortunately for those looking to drink this milk alternative, the hemp plant does not contain enough THC to have psychoactive affects. Further, the hemp plant has many incredible uses that can apply to various areas of our society. This is why there is such a great deal of controversy around the reasons behind hemp farming’s illegality in the USA.


The hemp plant, including its seeds, offers a powerful punch when it comes to nutrition. In a single 8-ounce glass of hemp milk you can find the following nutrients:

900mg Omega-3 Fatty Acid
2800mg Omega-6 Fatty Acid
All 10 Essential Amino Acids
4 grams of Digestible Protein
46% of RDA of Calcium
0% Cholesterol
Vitamin A
Vitamin E
Vitamin B12
Folic Acid
Vitamin D
And more…
From that stacked list we can see that hemp milk is a great source of nutritious protein and is capable of delivering the tough-to-find amino acid GLA. Hemp milk is rich in protein and contains omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, folic acid, and vitamins A, E, and B-12. It is also rich in magnesium, potassium, iron, and magnesium — all essential nutrients for a healthy diet and immune system.

Notable Benefits

Strengthened Immune System
Clear, Healthy Skin, Hair and Nails
Strong, Healthy Heart
Increased Mental Capacity
Hemp has anti-inflammatory agents and improves circulation.
Try Making Your Own

While hemp milk can be found in stores, mainly health food stores, if you are feeling adventurous, you can try making your own hemp milk. This will also allow you to try out the milk in small quantities if you are not sure if you will like it. To make the hemp milk you will need 1/2 cup of raw, organic, shelled hemp seeds and 2 cups of purified water. To finish you will need a piece of cheesecloth or a nut-milk bag. Blend the water and hemp seeds in a blender for about 3 minutes or until they are well blended. Once you are done blending, strain the milk through the cheesecloth and enjoy. Of course, it always tastes better cold so you might want to chill it first. This mixture should store in the fridge for about 3 days.

Final thoughts

If you are looking for a milk alternative and are tired of rice, almond, oat, or coconut milk, try giving hemp milk a shot. It is packed with nutrients and tastes great (at least in my opinion). Also, don’t forget that even if the milk does not fit your palate, the seeds are worth a try as well. They are a super food that you should definitely consider including in your diet whether you are vegan/vegetarian or not.

Sources: Collective Evolution

Will hemp replace fish as the king of omega 3?

From a nutritional standpoint, the leaves, flowers and seeds of hemp plants provide essential organic nutrition that cannot be obtained elsewhere. Interest in the oil from the flowers and seeds is at an all time high and showing no sign of slowing down.

Hemp seeds are incredibly nutrient dense. Besides containing arguably the highest quality protein in concentrations that exceed that of most other food sources, hemp seeds rule the world when it comes to polyunsaturated fatty acids like omega 3, 6 and others.

These are the special oils the body uses for detoxification, building brain cells, hormones, neurotransmitters and many other systems and functions in the body, not to mention resisting and reversing obesity.

As a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids, hemp seeds contain 11% more than sacha inchi seeds, 62% more than flax seeds, 96% more than chia seeds, 104% more than fish oil and 460% more than whole fish.
Hemp seeds also contain vitamins D3, E and A, cholesterol-fighting phytosterols, and are one of only a few sources of gamma linolenic acid (GLA), an essential fatty acid thought to be responsible for much of the anti-inflammatory properties that make hemp seed oil popular with people suffering arthritis and eczema.

EPA and DHA: non-essential?

Among the different compounds found in fish oil are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A number of claims are made about these fats. One of these is that you cannot get them from plants.

But guess where the fish get them from: plants! Marine algae produce the omega oils that fish eat and incorporate into their fat supplies. Fish do not make omega oils themselves. If they don’t eat algae they must eat other fish that have eaten algae.

The second claim is that EPA and DHA are essential to the diet. Is this true? As omega 3 fatty acid metabolites, EPA and DHA are not “essential” fatty acids. Indeed, the term “essential” only applies to alpha linolenic acid (omega 3) and linoleic acid (omega 6), which are essential fats found abundantly in hemp seeds, that your body cannot manufacture itself.

Guess what that means: your body can and does manufacture EPA and DHA itself. How much can the body manufacture? According to research, the answer is “as much as it needs”, just as long as you consume enough fresh alpha linolenic acid and linoleic acid in the ratio which is naturally found only in hemp seeds and walnuts.

Various studies have measured combined EPA and DHA conversion rates in humans at up to 30%. Factors that can increase and optimise conversion include an adequate dietary intake of magnesium.

And what is the world’s richest natural source of magnesium? Put it this way: hemp contains twice as much magnesium as dark chocolate.

For most people, a tablespoon of hemp seed oil can satisfy their daily EPA and DHA requirements.

However, having gone through a process of heating and bleaching with industrial solvents, while also possibly containing mercury, PCBs and dioxins, is fish oil really a health food?

Public health concern?
In the last 200 years, mercury levels have increased 300% in surface water and 250% in deep sea water, according to the Woods Hole oceanographic institute.

The World Health Organisation report, “Exposure to mercury: A major public health concern”, states that the main source of human exposure to mercury is eating fish. The WHO goes on to say that exposure to mercury is also a known cause of epilepsy, among other health catastrophes.

Since 1980, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled human trials with CBD, one of the cannabinoids found in hemp leaves and flowers, has shown that CBD successfully stops and prevents epileptic seizures and is safe even when consumed in amounts 5000% higher than what is necessary to achieve seizure control.

Joint research by teams of scientists from the US and Europe revealed that 97% of all human exposure to cancer-causing dioxins comes from eating meat, dairy and fish.

According to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the main source of human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is eating fish, and this can result in neurological and developmental retardation as well as increased cancer risk.

Oceans running out

A 2013 study of 13 of the top selling Children’s Fish Oil supplements in the US revealed that every one of them contained PCBs regardless of what kind of fish the oil came from and the method used to extract the oil including molecular distillation.

It is well known that heat can render omega oils toxic. According to Nordic Naturals, one of the world’s largest fish oil producers: “all fish oil, regardless of the kind of manufacturing process used… always requires the use of heat”

The argument over whether or not we should be eating fish may end up being decided for us. According to the United Nations, over 70% of the world’s fish are now “fully exploited or depleted” to such an extent that stocks of all species currently fished for food are predicted to collapse by 2048.

Hemp on the other hand merely needs to be replanted each year to supply the world’s essential nutrition needs sustainably.

Source:Food Navigator – Asia
Paul Benhaim is chief executive of Hemp Foods Australia and Elixinol. He developed the first hemp seed snack bar for the European market, has written a number of books on hemp and from next year will hold the only licence exemption from the Australian government to harvest the leaves and flowers of the hemp plant and turn them into Australian-made CBD extracts.

Hemp: Our Misunderstood Friend

Industrial hemp, the incredible clean cousin of the marijuana plant, offers a host of innovative solutions for our troubled world—from reducing global deforestation and malnutrition, to combating climate change, environmental damage and reliance on fossil fuels. Global Mana, in collaboration with ihemphi (industrial hemp Hawaii) and the research teams at the University of Hawai’i, drives awareness of how industrial hemp can help restore natural balance to our world. Hemp not only replenishes topsoil, it also opens new commercial doors to improve the economy of the people, providing sustainable sources of food, shelter, household products, clothing, fuel and building materials. From seed to core to outer fibers, hemp provides real solutions with potential to replace 25,000 chemical, petroleum and synthetic-based products in our daily lives. The first draft of the Declaration of Independence was written on hemp paper; Thomas Jefferson was a hemp farmer after all (so was George Washington). The 1914 US ten-dollar bill was printed on hemp paper and showed a hemp field. In 1941, Henry Ford built a Model-T car of out 70% cellulose hemp fiber (that was 10 times stronger than steel on impact) and ran on hemp biofuel. Our forefathers had the right idea.

Hemp seed and oil are some of the greatest immune system builders. They contain optimal levels of Omega 3 and 6, plus a plethora of other nutrients that inhibit cancer and tumor growth, increase metabolism and lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Hemp’s inner wood-like core, its heart, forms part of the next evolution in green building. The “shiv” or “huv,” as it’s known, makes strong, non-toxic construction materials, like hempcrete, that regulates humidity, makes buildings more energy efficient and reduces waste and emissions. This fast-growing, naturally mold, mildew and termite-resistant plant is also fire-retardant. The long outer fibers make natural insulation, clothing, plastics, bio-composites and more. We can now make eco-friendly fiberglass for boats, cars and house sidings out of hemp. We can also use hemp to filter toxins from our water systems. Recent scientific studies show that in some cases hemp makes amazing supercapacitators that outperform even graphene, the industry gold standard for energy storage. What are we waiting for?
Your Contribution helps support dedicated research programs for commercial and industrial hemp, as well as develop markets for this miraculous plant. Together, we will identify hemp’s cross-industry and invest in promoting hemp’s potential to replace nonrenewable resources.

Source : Global Mana