Things You Didn’t Know About CBD Oil For Dogs

Holistic vets have been sending us some interesting reports about the benefits of CBD oil for dogs in their care …

A senior Staffordshire Terrier had a 6cm mammary tumor and metastasis  that disappeared in 3 months and didn’t come back …

A Jack Russell Terrier had a severe heart murmur and painful arthritis and, after a month, he wanted to go for long walks and his murmur was much improved …

These are two examples of how Australian veterinarian Edward Bassingthwaighte discovered how CBD oil could be a critical part of his holistic veterinary practice. “I simply can’t explain the improved heart murmur” says Bassingthwaite. “They normally don’t get better.”

Related: How Cannabis Can Help Your Dog

CBD Oil For Dogs: What You Might Not Know

The results seem to be in … researchers are turning their attention to this herb and, so far, they’re finding there’s lots to like. And just as CBD has helped humans, your dog can reap the same health-boosting (and even life-saving) benefits.

Let’s look at the 10 things you might not know about this often misunderstood herb and the research that shows its promise in helping dogs with a variety of common health issues …

1. CBD Is Not Psychoactive

CBD (cannabidiol) is a compound found in cannabis and hemp. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) can also be found in cannabis and it’s this compound that gives marijuana its psychoactive properties. Most CBD oils are just that … the beneficial CBD without the THC. And they typically come from hemp, not marijuana. In short, your dog won’t get “high” from CBD oil … he’ll get the relaxation without the intoxication.

And speaking of relaxation …

2. CBD Oil Reduces Anxiety

Does your dog suffer from separation anxiety or noise phobias? CBD has been extensively studied for its effect on stress and anxiety. In humans, it’s been found to:

3. CBD Can Fights Cancer

CBD and other substances found in hemp and cannabis have been found to have an anti-tumor effect. CBD has even been shown to stop cancer cells from growing and increased tumor cell death.

  • CBD helps the immune system’s killer cells to cause cancer cell death.
  • CBD kills cancer cells by blocking their ability to produce energy.
  • CBD’s anti-tumor properties slow and inhibit glioma cell growth.
  • CBD can help increase the efficacy of conventional cancer treatment.

4. CBD Can Treat Seizures And Epilepsy

It’s estimated that up to 5% of dogs suffer from seizures. Most dogs with seizures are put on drugs such as phenobarbital and potassium bromide. While they may help control the seizures, they can be extremely harmful to your dog’s liver and other organs. And the drugs don’t work in all cases.

CBD has been shown to work well in drug-resistant epilepsy. In one study, 7 of 8 patients with epilepsy that was resistant to drugs saw a definite improvement within 4 to 5 months of taking CBD.

And a survey of children with treatment-resistant epilepsyfound that 84% of the children taking CBD had a reduction in the frequency of seizures.

5. CBD Relieves Pain

The cannabinoids in CBD work so well for pain that scientists are considering it as a new class of drug for the treatment of chronic pain. Studies show CBD to be very effective for:

6. CBD Can Help With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Animal studies show that CBD can prevent colitis (IBD) and restore normal gut motility in inflammatory bowel disease.

CBD also has antibiotic properties, including Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA).

7. CBD Reduces Chronic Inflammation And Autoimmune Disease

CBD has been shown to decrease the production and release of inflammatory cytokines that can cause allergies, hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. It can also suppress something called Th17 dominance, which is a major cause of autoimmune diseases.

CBD also inhibits the production of inflammatory macrophages and decreases chronic inflammation.

CBD is also a powerful antioxidant that’s shown to be more powerful than vitamins C and E.

8. CBD Can Protect The Nervous System And Help With Neurodegenerative Diseases

For dogs suffering from degenerative myelopathy and other spine and nerve issues, CBD shows a lot of promise. It’s been shown to help patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’sand Parkinson’s disease by protecting the brain cells from toxicity.

For senior dogs, CBD has been shown to protect the brain from cell death caused by free radicals and toxins.

9. CBD Increases Appetite And Helps With Nausea

If you have trouble getting your dog to eat, CBD may help. The National Cancer Institute reports that CBD increases appetite and carries this extra benefit, in addition to controlling cancer.

In animal studies, CBD has also been shown to help with vomiting and nausea, even when they’re the result of toxins and drugs.

10. CBD Promotes Cardiovascular Health

Just as veterinarian Dr Bassingthwaighte discovered, CBD has been linked to heart health. Studies show it can reduce the damage from damaged blood vessels and irregular heart rates, protect blood vessels from damage and dilate the arteries, and reduce heart rate and blood pressure associated with stress and anxiety.

Bonus: CBD Oil For Dogs Is Legal And Safe

With so many studies showing the health benefits of CBD, the most encouraging result is that CBD appears to be safe, even when taken in high doses and over extended periods of time. It can decrease the activity of liver enzymes used to metabolize many prescription drugs, so if your dog is on medication, you might want to check with your holistic vet before using CBD.

Most CBD oil for dogs and other pets is derived from hemp oil, so it contains no or very small traces of THC. Because of this, all 50 states have approved the use of hemp-based CBD for human and animal products.

The bottom line is, CBD oil could be a healthy (or even life-saving) herb for your dog. More and more pet owners and holistic vets are drawn to its diverse and marked health benefits and they feel good knowing the side effects are mild and animals don’t appear to build up a tolerance.

Choosing A Good CBD Oil For Your Dog

Not all CBD oils are the same … you’ll want a high quality CBD oil that works, so here are a few things to look for:

  • Make sure the product is organic: If it isn’t organic, your CBD oil contains pesticides, fungicides or solvents.
  • Don’t cheap out: The higher the quality and purity, the higher the cost. Don’t price shop … make sure your CBD oil is free of additives and has a good amount of CBD.
  • Get the analysis: Ask for a lab analysis of the amount of CBD in the product. Many CBD oils contain only small amounts of CBD. The manufacturer should provide a certificate of analysis. You’ll also want to make sure there is little or no THC in the product.
  • Buy CBD as a tincture: You can buy CBD in treats but the best form is in a tincture. This way, you can adjust your dog’s dose drop by drop to make sure he gets the most benefit.

Start your dog off slowly but don’t let the naysayers tell you CBD isn’t a good option for your dog … the research is being done and the results are very promising.

Source : Dogs Naturally Magazine – By Dana Scott

Hemp meet Bamboo

We are being weaned off energy to provide higher profit margins for depleting resources!

We must support the climate agreement to provide the missing link. After four years in preparation, we are debuting “Plan B” to the climate change problem. We all will not build wind turbines or solar panels. However, we all buy plastic products, hygiene products and toilet paper. We need another option to make an impact. Here is ours. We propose expanding the renewable energy discussion to the 84,000 toxic chemicals in products we buy every day made from fossil fuels. Where our protest is conveyed through purchase, leading to US factories producing hemp and bamboo products to service companies like Ford, Kimberly-Clark, Ikea, and while also supplying small and medium size businesses lower cost materials.

It’s simple.

No Profit, No Pipelines, No Pollution.

Here is how we fight. Not through Protest, but through Purchase!! If we pressure US companies to build products with hemp and bamboo we can create local supply chains, jobs and lower cost materials. It is cheaper to grow than drill. That is where I need your help to build OUR economy. Crowdfunded farms, factories processing hemp and bamboo. It is possible. There is a perfect Storm for Change and YOU can start it. Let’s hit them where it hurts!

Our primary focus is to return jobs to the United States. A bioeconomy is more than about renewable energy. It is also about the materials we use in the development and manufacture of consumer goods.

Factories close to fields of bamboo and hemp is our goal. It’s not rocket science. It’s prudent business practices. We start with the easiest products to manufacture from bamboo & industrial hemp:

Food Biochar Pulp filler Fibers

As manufacturers realize a reliable domestic and international supply chain, businesses gain the incentive to return manufacturing activities to the United States.
you invest in her?
Maybe. What if she told you she is also selling her fiber to Georgia Pacific for toilet paper and paper towels? Your money is more secure. If her clothing suddenly failed overnight, you’re still safe. She still has revenue from the Hemp and bamboo growing. With the over 50,000 uses Hemp and Bamboo provides, she also has another shot at success.
Now, what if your city government wants to lease the abandoned land or an ugly factory you drive by every day? The Government sees jobs from your neighbor with the same failsafe in place. A big corporation buying the plants.

It starts here.

Pressure big business and tell them you will buy 7bamboo and hemp products. Offer them the security of a market and save the companies millions spent every year to reach you. Tell them. They will listen. It’s only to their benefit. They have great public relations and if we can’t grow, they can say “we tried.” Right now all companies like Ikea are claiming is “we can’t find it.” Show them where to look.

Political action will facilitate government economic development packages for businesses. Manufacturing in the United States will be feasible at labor rates that will create a vibrant economy again.

Manufacturing locally can also protect manufacturers’ intellectual property and alleviate additional costs of overseas supply chains such as:
Copies or ‘fakes’ in the marketplace.
Higher quality control resulting in lower litigation rates.
Negative Public Image.

They want to do this and they will. Why? They lied about the greenness of products in 2007 and 2008 with the Greenwash scandals all to get your dollars. They don’t have to lie anymore.

appreciate if you could share our Go Fund Me page and Petition. If you are unable to donate please share our petition and this project! We cannot “market” this it has to be organic or our voices will be lost on the companies we are pressuring to order bamboo and hemp fibers. We need your help. By purchasing the game, you are also supplying 200 games to Nonprofits and NGOS that are building young minds to provide themselves and their families a future.

Proceeds additionally pay for the travel and endless meetings it will take to give your friends the “guarantee” they need. They will support your project when you start growing hemp and bamboo They know the hemp and bamboo will have somewhere to be sold and they can invest in your farm or factory via the JOBSACT!

Here is our SOLUTION!

We were also featured in Treehugger and will be doing additional interviews this week.

Let’s work together for TANGIBLE solutions not Laws or promises to change without penalties! Let’s work together to create a bioeconomy that creates more opportunities for all of us, new commodity markets and material options for young entrepreneurs. With the recent push for renewable energy, we must deny the profits from the fossil fuels that go into the construction of turbines and solar panels

GoFundMe Campaign
gofundme.com/bioeconomy
Petition:
causes.com/campaigns/97871-tell-u-s-companies-we-will-buy-change-to-end-fossil-fuels

If you wish to donate directly to the Foundation please click this link. foundationforabioeconomy.org/#!donate/cirf

We can DO THIS! We can put the Power of Protest through purchase in YOUR HANDS! Help us tell US Companies we will buy Hemp and bamboo in paper pulp, biomass, auto interior parts, and BIOPLASTICS! Provide us a voice, we will provide methods everyone can duplicate.

Amanda Clayton-Stevens

Can Hemp Clean Up the Earth?

In 2017, Gavin Stonehouse, a graduate student in plant biology at Colorado State University, started cultivating hemp plants in a special soil mixture dosed with varying levels of selenium. A mineral that occurs naturally in most of the western United States, selenium is also a nasty environmental pollutant when produced in excess by industrial and agricultural activities. Stonehouse wanted to find out if hemp could handle the selenium. If the plants thrived, it would be an important first step towards proving claims that industrial hemp naturally cleans soils contaminated with a multitude of toxic substances – a process known as “bioremediation” or “phytoremediation.” The next step will be to discover just how much of the selenium the plants extract, and where the mineral ends up – in the plants’ roots, stems, seeds or flowers.Stonehouse and his advisor, CSU professor Elizabeth Pilon-Smits, plan to publish their results this summer. But the early indications are promising. The hemp was “super tolerant” of the selenium, says Stonehouse. Not a single plant died, and only a few, exposed to the highest doses, showed signs of stress.The implications of the experiment go beyond just the potential for healthier soil. As humans have known for thousands of years, hemp is a plant that boasts abundant industrial, nutritive and medicinal properties. You can eat its seeds, treat pain and inflammation with its oils and make clothing, rope and paper from its fibers. And now, in the 21st century, we’re discovering that it can perform like a kind of a toxic-substance vacuum cleaner too?

If you can clean up the environment and still get a commercial product,” says Stonehouse, “you are killing two birds with one stone.”

The term “phytoremediation,” was coined by the scientist Ilya Raskin, a member of a team that tested hemp’s ability to accumulate heavy metals from soil in contaminated fields near Chernobyl in the 1990s. According to another team member, Vyacheslav Dushenkov, the experiment was a success. “For the specific contaminants that we tested, hemp demonstrated very good phytoremediation properties,” says Dushenkov,

In 2001, a team of German researchers confirmed the Chernobyl results by showing that hemp was able to extract lead, cadmium and nickel from a plot of land contaminated with sewage sludge. In 2011, hundreds of farmers in Puglia, Italy, started testing the theory, planting hemp in a long-term effort to clean up fields disastrously polluted by a massive steel plant. (Conclusive data on how well the Italian bioremediation project is working doesn’t appear to be available yet, but the farmers have been cleared to sell harvested hemp fiber for industrial use.)

Pilon-Smits, the CSU professor, has been studying phytoremediation for more than a decade. She had long been aware of the international research suggesting hemp was a prime candidate for environmental cleanup. But until very recently, her hands were tied. For nearly a century, commercial cultivation of hemp was forbidden in the United States, fallout from the widespread panic over marijuana that swept the Western world in the 1930s. (Hemp and marijuana are strains of the same species, cannabis sativa; the primary difference is that marijuana gets you high, and hemp does not.)

Even after Colorado legalized recreational marijuana in 2012 and passed a bill encouraging research into hemp’s phytoremediative qualities in 2014. That same year, Congress added a provision to the farm bill that legalized the cultivation of hemp for research purposes, but Pilon-Smits still found it difficult to get academic funding for research. (Although numerous states have passed legislation encouraging industrial hemp cultivation and normalizing marijuana laws, both substances are still federally restricted. Even in forward-looking Colorado, suggests Pilon-Smits, a university that gave the go-ahead to research on hemp might run the risk of losing federal funding.)

But in the last couple of years, the political climate has changed drastically. In April, ultra-conservative Republican Mitch McConnell, the Senate Majority Leader, introduced the Hemp Farming Act of 2018 which would specifically remove hemp from the Controlled Substances Act. McConnell is currently maneuvering to get his stand-alone hemp bill incorporated into the 2018 Farm Bill.

In 2017, when Colorado Cultivars, a company that operates several industrial hemp farms, approached Pilon-Smits to ask if she was interested in analyzing hemp’s potential for cleaning up soil, she jumped at the chance. She quickly brought on Stonehouse for the hands-on work, and started, as far as she knows, one of the first comprehensive research efforts in the United States aimed at establishing hemp’s qualifications as an environmental savior.

If that sounds like a hippie dream, that’s because it is. For decades activists fighting for the normalization of marijuana laws have touted the manifold beneficial uses of hemp as a kind of stalking horse for pot legalization. The somewhat fuzzy logic seemed to be that if laws against hemp were loosened, the case for marijuana’s legalization would be strengthened. But in a sequence of events unimaginable a decade ago, the opposite happened: pressure to ease restrictions on marijuana ended up paving the way for hemp’s redemption. The groundswell that emerged from the spread of medical marijuana led directly to what Doug Fine, author of 2014’s Hemp Bound: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Next Agricultural Revolution, calls the “hemp renaissance.”

For Fine, hemp is nothing less than a savoir of humanity, a miracle plant that will revivify depleted soils, mitigate the threat of climate change, and re-establish harmonic balance between humans and the environment.

“It is the most important plant for the future of humanity,” says Fine, speaking to Rolling Stone from Hawaii, where he is working as a hemp-seed oil researcher for the University of Hawaii. For Fine, the vision of a hemp lifecycle in which the plant is used to remediate soil and then converted into environmentally friendly products is an example of “regenerative values” that are currently leaking out of the crunchy hippie communities and spreading “into the basics of our economy and society.”

And at first glance, there are any number of reasons, according to Pilon-Smits and Stonehouse, why hemp has superstar phytoremediative potential. Hemp is a hardy plant that grows like, well, a weed, just about anywhere. It produces a relative abundance of bushy biomass in a short period of time, which means it is highly effective at extracting nutrients from the soil and converting them into potentially useful products. Its relatively deep and extensive root structure, unusual for an annual plant, allows it to probe widely through contaminated soil. It is also naturally resistant to insect predators, thus obviating the need for pesticides.

The full environmental picture, however, is not quite so balmy. As with most commercial crops, industrial cultivation of hemp depletes the soil of key fertilizing compounds such as nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Producing all that biomass requires significant inputs of water and runs the same risks of soil erosion as other industrial plants. A hemp-based economy, in other words, doesn’t automatically usher in a green future.

There is also still a great deal to learn about what can be done with hemp plants that have been deployed to clean up especially dangerous contaminants. There is unlikely to be a market, any time soon, for edible hemp seeds or CBD oil from plants that have been used to extract cadmium or lead from Superfund sites. And at present, we simply don’t yet have enough data to understand exactly how hemp stores the contaminants it extracts and what that might mean for possible health implications.

Still, it’s possible to visualize some sweet spots where everything comes together. One of the reasons why Pilon-Smits and Stonehouse are excited about their selenium research is that even though excess selenium is an environmental pollutant, it is also, in small doses, a necessary nutrient for human life. Over a billion people in the world are selenium deficient, says Pilot-Smits. If industrial hemp removed selenium from the earth and concentrated it in edible hemp seeds, it would be possible to simultaneously clean up the environment and improve human nutrition.

“If hemp grows well,” says Pilon-Smits, “the phytoremediation will pay for itself. There are many degraded or marginal soils that are taken out of production and polluted soils awaiting cleanup because there are not enough funds available to pay for it. Hemp can really be a solution.”

Source : RollingStone

Hemp Could Free Us From Oil, Prevent Deforestation, Cure Cancer, and It’s Environmentally Friendly

Hemp is a tall, beautiful and gracious looking annual plant that can reach heights over twelve feet – and even that il mattes more than many people know about it.

Fortunately, we’re here with an education to offer you.

Although hemp (cannabis sativa) and marijuana (cannabis sativa var. indica) come from a similar species of plant, they are very different and confusion has been caused by deliberate misinformation with far reaching effects on socioeconomics as well as on environmentars.

The reason hemp is illegal is not because of any negative impact to the environment or human health, but exactly the opposite. It is so environmentally friendly, nutritionally and medicinally beneficial, that it provides too many abundant resources which would make it impossible for powerful corporations to compete.

Historical Use

Hemp is the most universally useful plant we have at our disposal. The history of mankind’s use of hemp can be traced way back in time to between about 5000 – 7000 BC. Remains of seed husks have been found at Neolithic burial sites in central Europe, which indicate that they were used in funeral rites and shamanic ceremonies. It is probable that at that time the distinctions between various strains were not as pronounced as they are today.

Up until and even during WWII, hemp was a widely grown crop, which provided the world with an excellent and most durable source of fibre. Since it is an annual with a growing cycle of only 120 days it can be harvested several times a year, depending on local weather conditions. Its biomass is considerable, which means that it absorbs large quantities of the greenhouse gas CO2.

It is resistant to bugs and requires little agrochemical treatment. It is extremely undemanding and can be grown in very poor conditions and depleted soils and will actually improve the soil structure over a period of years. For many centuries hemp was one of the most important industrial crops which provided the fibres for rope and tough, durable canvass without which the age of exploration could never have set sail.

In the US too, there have long been numerous rules and regulation in place regarding the cultivation of hemp. But unlike today’s regulations that strongly prohibit any cultivation of hemp, less than a century ago hemp cultivation was not just encouraged, but mandatory, with hefty fines being levied against farmers who refused. ‘Hemp for Victory’ was the government coined slogan that fuelled the last big bout of legal hemp cultivation during WWII, promoting hemp cultivation as a patriotic cause.

Source : Truth Command

Illinois Farmers One Step Closer To Growing Industrial Hemp

Illinois lawmakers approved legisltation that would allow farmers to grow industrial hemp. Hemp is derived from the cannabis plant, but it has a non-drug use. It can create bio-degradable building materials, paper, textiles and more.

It’s an idea that’s been proposed for years at the statehouse, though previously it failed to gain enough support. Despite its little-to-no THC levels – the mind-altering component in cannabis – the stigma associated with marijuana was a hurdle.

State Representative Tim Butler, a Republican from Springfield, said this legislation makes a clear distinction about the purpose of the crop.

“This adds to the diversification for farmers,” said Butler. “It allows them to do other things other than corn and beans and to find another source of revenue to come in the door.”

Democratic state Representative Jerry Costello from Smithton said he voted against the idea in the past, but he’s changed his mind.

“I voted no because it was federally illegal,” said Costello. “Since the past farm bill was passed last year, it’s now legal in the United States. If you look at what hemp is used for, it’s used for a number of products.”

The measure has passed both chambers of the state’s General Assembly. If the governor signs it – the Illinois Department of Agriculture has 120 days to set rules for the program. The Illinois Farm Bureau said they support the idea, as well.

Source : Northern Public Radiohead

Hemp brings jobs and more than $16.7 million in sales to Kentucky

A report card of sorts grading hemp’s impact on Kentucky showed these scores:

Eighty-one new full-time jobs. More than $16.7 million in gross product sales. And $7.5 million for farmers.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles included these figures from last year in an April 24 letter to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Rand Paul calling hemp’s economic impact “significant.”

“My goal is to make Kentucky an epicenter for hemp farmers and processors,” Quarles wrote, according to a copy of the letter obtained this week by Courier Journal.

He said he wants Kentucky to “have a head start in the race against competitors in other states,” as he anticipates Congress will remove the crop from the list of federally controlled substances. McConnell is pushing for this legislative change to remove a barrier inhibiting the versatile plant some call marijuana’s kissing cousin. This would clear up confusion about whether its products are or aren’t legal.

The push to legalize: Mitch McConnell is fighting hard to legalize hemp

More info: Are you breaking the law when you buy hemp products?

Police have fought the legalization of hemp since 2012, complaining that they can’t easily decipher hemp from marijuana, said Tommy Loving, head of the Kentucky Narcotics Officers’ Association.

McConnell was key to the federal “2014 Farm Bill” that gave states the power to allow industrial hemp and to test the market to see if consumers would buy its products — which range from “superfood” seeds to clothing and cannabidiol or CBD oils used to treat headaches. The Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol — a psychoactive compound better known as THC — was limited to 0.3, a negligible amount that won’t allow for a buzz.

In Kentucky, hemp can only be grown with the approval of state agriculture officials while it remains a controlled substance. Quarles said other states have called for help modeling their program after the one Kentucky uses.

Source: Louisville Courier Journal

Health Benefits of Hemp

Hemp has been called a plant of “major economic importance,” as it grows like a weed, yet can be used in the production of food, personal care products, textiles, paper, and even plastic and construction materials.

Valued since ancient times as a fiber source for textiles, the hemp industry eventually made it to the US, where it flourished in the mid-1800s, through World War I and again briefly during World War II, when the war cut off supplies of fiber.

In the US, the cultivation of hemp has been banned since the 1970s when the federal Controlled Substances Act took effect. The law doesn’t distinguish between marijuana, the drug, and hemp, the plant, despite major scientific differences.

Ironically, the US is the world’s largest consumer of hemp products, yet is the only industrialized country that also outlaws its production. As a result, all US hemp products – a more than $600-million market in the US – are imported. As noted in “Hemp: A New Crop with New Uses for North America:”

“Cannabis sativa [hemp] is extremely unusual in the diversity of products for which it is or can be cultivated. Popular Mechanics magazine (1938) touted hemp as ‘the new billion dollar crop,’ stating that it ‘can be used to produce more than 25,000 products, ranging from dynamite to Cellophane.'”

What’s the Difference Between Hemp and Marijuana
Hemp and marijuana come from the same plant species, Cannabis sativa, but there are noted differences between the two plants. They both contain cannabidiol (CBD), which has medicinal properties. The amount of CBD however, differs greatly between the two.

Dosing, therefore, is dramatically different when you to try to use hemp in lieu of cannabis for medicinal purposes, as the latter, cannabis, is up to 100-fold more potent.

Another difference that appears to matter in terms of its usefulness as medicine relates to differing terpene profiles. Hemp contains very little of these valuable medicinal compounds.

Lastly, there’s the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. THC is the psychoactive component of marijuana; it’s the molecule that makes you feel “stoned.” (While cannabidiol (CBD) also has certain psychoactive properties.

It does NOT produce a high.) By legal definition, hemp cannot have more than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in it. So to summarize:

Hemp has less value for medicinal uses, as it only contains about 4 percent CBD and lacks many of the medicinal terpenes and flavonoids.
It also contains less than 0.3 percent THC, which means it cannot produce a high or get you stoned. While hemp may not have the same medicinal uses as marijuana, it does have excellent nutritional value that may boost health.

Marijuana can act as a potent medicine courtesy of high amounts (about 10 to 20 percent) of CBD, critical levels of medicinal terpenes, and flavonoids, as well as THC in varying ratios for various diseases. The higher the THC, the more pronounced its psychoactive effects.
Genetic Difference Between Hemp and Marijuana Uncovered
If there were still any question over whether or not hemp and marijuana are two different plants, it should be put to rest with the publication of a new study that shows the genetic difference between hemp and marijuana.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota’s (U of M) College of Biological Sciences and College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural Resource Sciences belong to one of the few groups of US scientists that have been granted federal clearance to study cannabis.

After more than 12 years of research, the team found a single gene that is responsible for the genetic differences between hemp and marijuana. As noted by Medical Daily:

“While hemp produces a non-euphoric cannabidiol (CBD) with approximately 0.3 to 1.5 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration, marijuana is packed with between five to 10 percent (or even higher) psychoactive THC concentration.”

The researchers believe they have “indisputable evidence” that hemp and marijuana should be regarded as separate plants.

Nearly half of US states now separate hemp from marijuana. George Weiblen, a professor with a joint appointment in the U of M’s College of Biological Sciences and College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences, said:

“It’s a plant of major economic importance that is very poorly understood scientifically… With this study, we have indisputable evidence for a genetic basis of differences among cannabis varieties, further challenging the position that all cannabis should be regulated as a drug.”

Health Benefits of Hemp
One of the under-appreciated benefits of hemp, at least in the US, is as a food source. Hemp seeds, which are technically a nut and are also known as “hemp hearts,” are rich in healthy fats, protein, and minerals.

Hemp seeds are usually consumed after the hard outer shell is removed, leaving just the soft, creamy “heart” behind. The seeds have a slight nutty flavor, making them incredibly versatile for use in cooking, baking, or for adding to smoothies and salads. Some of their primary health benefits include:

Excellent Source of Nutrition
Hemp seeds are composed of more than 30 percent healthy fats, including the essential fatty acids linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid (plant-based omega-3). According to research published in Nutrition & Metabolism:

“Dietary hempseed is… particularly rich in the omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid (LA) and also contains elevated concentrations of the omega-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid (ALA). The LA:ALA ratio normally exists in hempseed at between 2:1 and 3:1 levels. This proportion has been proposed to be ideal for a healthy diet.”

Hemp seeds also contain gamma-linolenic acid, which supports the normal function and growth of cells, nerves, muscles, and organs throughout your body.

Hemps seeds are about 25 percent protein and also provide nutrients including vitamin E, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron, and zinc.

Heart Health
Hemp seeds contain numerous heart-healthy compounds, including the amino acid arginine. L-arginine is a precursor to nitric oxide in your body. It has been shown to enhance blood flow and help you maintain optimal blood pressure. Nitric oxide signals the smooth muscle cells in your blood vessels to relax, so that your vessels dilate and your blood flows more freely.

This helps your arteries stay free of plaque. When you have inadequate nitric oxide, your risk for coronary artery disease increases. The gamma-linolenic acid found in hemp seeds is anti-inflammatory, another bonus for heart health. Past research has also shown hemp seeds may help reduce blood pressure, decrease the risk of blood clots, and boost recovery after a heart attack.

Skin Health
Fatty-acid deficiency can manifest in a variety of ways, but skin problems such as eczema, thick patches of skin, and cracked heels are common. Hemp seeds are a rich source of fatty acids in the optimal omega-6 to omega-3 ratio. Research suggests hempseed oil may improve symptoms of atopic dermatitis and potentially provide relief from eczema.

Plant-Based Protein
Although I believe protein from high-quality animal sources is beneficial for most people, if you are following a plant-based diet, hemp makes a healthy source of protein. With all of the essential amino acids and an amount of protein similar to beef (by weight), hemp seeds are an excellent form of plant-based protein.

Two to three tablespoons of hemp seeds provides about 11 grams of protein, complete with the amino acids lysine, methionine, and cysteine. Two main proteins in hemp seed protein, albumin and edestin, are rich in essential amino acids, with profiles comparable to soy and egg white. Hemp’s edestin content is among the highest of all plants. Hemp protein is also easy to digest because of its lack of oligosaccharides and trypsin inhibitors, which can affect protein absorption.

PMS and Menopause Symptoms
The gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) in hemp seeds produces prostaglandin E1, which reduces the effects of the hormone prolactin. Prolactin is thought to play a role in the physical and emotional symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). GLA in hemp seeds may also help reduce the symptoms of menopause.

Digestion
Whole hemp seeds contain both soluble and insoluble fiber, which may support digestive health and more. Soluble fiber dissolves into a gel-like texture, helping to slow down your digestion. This helps you to feel full longer and is one reason why fiber may help with weight control. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve at all and helps add bulk to your stool. This helps food to move through your digestive tract more quickly for healthy elimination.

Fiber plays an essential role in your digestive, heart, and skin health, and may improve blood sugar control, weight management, and more. Please note that only whole hemp seeds contain high amounts of fiber; the de-shelled hemp seeds or “hearts” contain very little fiber.

Agricultural Hemp Returns to Kentucky
Kentucky was once home to a flourishing hemp industry, but once hemp was outlawed, tobacco became the go-to cash crop. That is now slowly changing once again, as farmers take advantage of the five-year pilot Industrial Hemp Research Program, which was established by James Comer, Kentucky’s commissioner of Agriculture. The program is one recently launched in a number of states, where permission has been granted for industrial hemp to be grown for research purposes. As reported by Newsweek:

“Kentucky led the U.S. industrial hemp business until the end of the Civil War, when production of the crop declined and was generally replaced by tobacco. The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 put the kibosh on all production and sales of cannabis, including industrial hemp, but the crop saw a rapid resurgence during World War II. Hemp fiber became essential to produce military necessities such as uniforms and parachutes.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture launched its national ‘Hemp for Victory’ program, which provided seeds and draft deferments to farmers. In 1942, farmers planted 36,000 acres of hemp seed. A USDA-funded informational film from that year noted that ‘hemp grows so luxuriantly in Kentucky that harvesting is sometimes difficult.'”

Comer reportedly wants to “single-handedly turn industrial hemp into Kentucky’s No. 1 cash crop” and “breathe new life into family farms that have lost millions of dollars with the fall of the tobacco industry.” Currently, most industrial hemp comes from China, but the plant could bring great economic growth to areas of the US. Among the many products provided by industrial hemp are:

Cannabidiol (CBD), the medicinal compound, which can be extracted from the leaves, blossoms, and stems
Cannabis oil, which comes from cold-pressing the seeds and can be used for cooking, cosmetics, and beauty products
Fiber, which can be used as a substitute for cotton, wood, and plastic, with potentially endless uses
Hemp seeds, which are poised to become a human superfood and could also be used in animal feed
Hemp Could Provide an Environmentally Friendly Alternative to Plastic
Hemp plastic is a “material of the future” that could drastically cut down on the need for plastics and their devastating toll on the environment. In some cases, standard plastics may be reinforced with hemp, which may account for up to 80 percent of the plastic’s weight. Hemp can also be used to make 100 percent hemp plastic, which is recyclable and can be 100 percent biodegradable.

Currently, the most common type of hemp plastics are those infused with hemp fibers, which means less plastic is used and the resulting product is more durable (hemp plastic is said to be five times stiffer and 2.5 times stronger than polypropylene). According to Hempowered.com:

“Using sustainable and renewable natural plant fibers (such as hemp, flax, jute, and kenaf) and through industrial production techniques that mix them into plastics, a new award winning (Biomaterial of the year 2010) granule has been made from a combination of hemp with polypropylene, thus reducing the use of petroleum products.

… Their recoverable component comes from these natural plants and can make up over half of their weight, up to 80 percent. All these features make them suitable for the production of durable products. Hemp Plastic granules offer many advantages like good insulation, dimensional stability at high temperatures, a high thermal deformation temperature, and impermeability… The granules are currently produced for a range of applications in automobiles, construction materials, packaging, toys, and electronic products and launched onto the market in 2010.”

Your health is under siege from every direction. Environmental toxins, ultra-processed foods, EMFs, government-subsidized GMOs and a host of other threats surround us. It is simply not possible to protect yourself unless you are armed with cutting edge health information.

The most complex tasks can be made easy if you just take one step at a time. Taken as a whole, this 30-tip plan makes for a comprehensive guide that can change your life. Just a few of the topics addressed are:

What to eat and when to eat it
Exercise strategies that you can implement today
The power of emotional health
Enhancing your health with essentials like air, sunshine and water
How to get the restorative sleep that your body requires
It may seem that health and wellness are no longer the norm. An opioid epidemic sweeps the country, the obesity rate is skyrocketing, life expectancy is dropping and chronic diseases are rampant. Our communities are being damaged at every level and the only way to reverse these trends is through education and personal example. My 30-tip plan provides you with the tools you need to take control of your health. The time is ripe for revolution — a health revolution.

Source: Dr Mercola

Hemp Cars Could Be Wave of the Future

A car made from grass may not sound sturdy, but scientists say plant-based cars are the wave of the future.

Researchers in Australia and England are working on developing materials from plants like hemp and elephant grass to replace plastic and metal-based car components. Scientists say the materials are biodegradable and can increase fuel efficiency since they weigh about 30 percent less than currently used materials.

“The lighter the car, the less fuel you need to propel it,” explains Alan Crosky of the School of Material Science and Engineering in the University of New South Whales in Australia.

Use, Then Bury

Crosky and his partners have been developing tough material from hemp, the reedy, less controversial cousin of the marijuana plant. “Hemp fibers have higher strength to weight ratios than steel and can also be considerably cheaper to manufacture,” he says.

The hemp used in car construction contains only traces of the narcotic tetrahydrocannabinol, which lends marijuana its psychedelic effect.

Crosky explains building cars — even their outer shells — from plants like hemp could reduce the number of rusting car bodies and rotting car parts on old lots. The plant fibers are cleaned, heated, in some cases blended with small amounts of biodegradable plastics and molded into hardened paneling and filling.

Each year in the United States, 10 million to 11 million vehicles putter out and reach the end of their useful lives. While a network of salvage and shredder facilities process about 96 percent of these old cars, about 25 percent of the vehicles by weight, including plastics, fibers, foams, glass and rubber, remains as waste.

A car made mostly of heated, treated and molded hemp, says Crosky, could simply be buried at its life end and then consumed naturally by bacteria.

Europe Leading the Way

The idea has already taken firm root in countries like Germany and Britain, where manufacturers are required to pay tax for the disposal of old vehicles. As environmental issues become more pertinent, researchers believe natural fibers are likely to become a major component of cars around the world.

“Manufacturers pay a lot of money here to landfill something,” says Mark Johnson, an engineer at the University of Warwick Manufacturing Group in England. “If it’s made from degradable parts, you don’t have to pay.”

Johnson and his team have been creating parts from elephant grass, a bamboo-like plant that, he says, requires less processing than hemp to harden and mold into car components.

German car companies including Mercedes (Daimler/Chrysler), BMW and Audi Volkswagen have been leading the way in incorporating plant fibers in their models. Since the introduction of jute-based door panels in the Mercedes E class five years ago, German car companies have more than tripled their use of natural fibers to about 15,500 tons in 1999.

The next trend could be in building the shells of cars from plants. Crosky says he and his team are now looking at building exterior car panels from hemp.

In the United States, automobile companies have approached the idea more gingerly.

“We use natural fibers only when it makes sense technologically,” says Phil Colley, a spokeman for the Ford Motor Co.

Colley says Ford has used flax, recycled cotton and a 14-foot tall, fibrous crop called kenaf in some parts, including under front hoods to dampen the sound of slamming them shut. Deere & Co. has used soy-based fiberglass composites in the panels of some of its tractors. By 2010, the New Jersey consulting firm Kline & Company anticipates natural fibers to replace a fifth of the fiberglass in current U.S. car models.

While researchers tout their benefits, Colley points are there are some drawbacks. Smell can become a problem, he says, particularly with hemp which can produce a musty odor when incorporated into a vehicle.

“You have to take into account all the tradeoffs,” Colley says.

Inspirations in History

Although fiber car components may be a thing of the future, the idea of manufacturing material from fibrous plants dates back to even ancient times. Fragments of fabric woven from hemp have been found from 8,000 BC. Bamboo and sturdy grasses have been used in construction for centuries and plots in Japan still provide hemp to weave the emperor’s religious robes.

Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor Co., first toyed with the idea of plant-based car parts in 1940, when he took an ax and whacked the hood of a car trunk made from a soybean-based material to test its strength.

The car hood reportedly withstood the blow and now, 70 years later, car companies, including Ford’s own, have finally begun to put the concept to use.

“Increasing the use of biodegradable and recycled materials will lower the impact of vehicle disposal,” says Jim Kliesch, a researcher at the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, a nonprofit, Washington-based organization dedicated to improving the environmental impact of technologies. “And that can only be a good thing.”

Source: ABC News

Why women will swap wine for weed when it’s legal

Sipping on a glass of wine, whether it be for relief after a long day or just for the buzz, is the norm for professional women, especially those living in states where cannabis is not accessible. That’s because going to the store for a bottle of Merlot, or ten, is permissible all across the U.S. whereas a gram of weed alone can cause you to lose your job, or worse, your entire career. In legal states, however, alcohol sales are already declining as consumers opt for the herb instead.

At the present time, recreational cannabis is legal in nine states and the District of Columbia, with the possibility of Michigan becoming the tenth come November. Not to mention, there are also 29 states with medical marijuana laws. With legalization on the rise, will more women convert from wine to weed? The experts over at Rabobank, the most substantial food & agribusiness bank in Europe, are convinced they will.

Why professionals believe legal weed may just be the new wine for women.

According to the experts from Rabobank, there are three solid reasons to believe that women will want to put down the wine glass once weed is legal across the continent. For one, weed is an attractive option for health-conscious women. A single glass of wine contains anywhere from 110 to 300 calories. Marijuana, on the other hand, comes with no calories whatsoever, making it ideal for women wanting to lose weight or embrace a healthier lifestyle in general.

It’s no secret that cannabis is better for you than alcohol. Not to mention, safer. Alcohol is responsible for thousands of deaths annually while weed is a cause for zero. Although smoking anything, including marijuana, isn’t that good for you, legalization has brought on numerous ways to consume the plant, many of which are smoke-free, like edibles, vaporizers, and infused beverages. Even though weed in any form can cause the munchies, aka a case of the “I need food and lots of it,” studies show it doesn’t increase your BMI. On the contrary, it turns out that people who consume cannabis have a lower BMI than those who don’t partake.

Older, wealthier women are also highly likely to swap weed for wine as it becomes legal, according to Rabobank analysts. The reason is that they have gained the most valuables throughout their lifetimes, such as beautiful homes and nice cars. These women also have high-paying careers and they don’t want to sacrifice it all for an illegal gram of weed. But if cannabis is legal, research shows, older wealthy women are most likely to give it a try than other demographics.

Should the wine industry be concerned?

Even in recreational states, you still have ladies who love their wine. But more people are also smoking weed in these states than before. Take Oregon, for example. According to Rabobank, before legalization, the growth rate of marijuana use was at 1.4 percent. Post-legalization, however, the growth rate has climbed significantly to 16.5 percent.

Despite legalization sweeping the nation, the wine industry isn’t likely to take a significant hit. After all, there are plenty of moments that call for a tall glass of wine, like a good meal or a night of Netflix and chill. But that doesn’t mean the wine industry shouldn’t be prepared for competition. Dispensaries no longer look like sketchy hole-in-the-wall joints, and women aren’t limited strictly to smoking cannabis. With that being said, there couldn’t be a more comfortable or opportune time for women to make the switch from wine to weed than now.

Source : Herb

 

7 Ways Hemp Plastic Could Change the World

Did you know that it takes between 500-1,000 years for plastic to degrade?

Plastic pollution is destroying our planet by the minute. In fact, so much plastic is thrown away each year it could circle the earth four times. And these numbers are on the rise.

In the United States alone, Americans throw away 35 billion plastic water bottles every year. This plastic ends up in the land and the sea, devastating natural ecosystems. Worse yet, this same plastic pollution ends up in our bodies.

It’s estimated that 93 percent of Americans over the age of six test positive for BPA, a chemical in plastic linked to cancer, diabetes, impaired immunity, and much more.

Clearly, plastic pollution is an environmental and health hazard. But what if hemp could help?

The basic building blocks of plastic are cellulose. Currently, cellulose is primarily obtained from petroleum. However, petroleum-based plastics are harmful to human health. Not to mention destructive to the environment.

Hemp, on the other hand, happens to be an excellent source of cellulose and is sustainable.

Here are 7 ways how hemp plastic could change our planet.

1. Hemp plastic is completely biodegradable
One reason plastic is so toxic is because of its long shelf life.

A water bottle may only be used for a few minutes but will take years to decompose. Account for other plastic wares like grocery bags, tupperware, buttons, packaging, electronics – it’s easy to see why plastic pollution is growing worldwide.

Meanwhile, hemp plastic can be completely biodegradable when made with biodegradable polymers. Unlike conventional plastics, plastic made from hemp doesn’t contribute to permanent pollution.

In the right environment hemp plastic takes around 3-6 months to decompose. This is astonishing in comparison to conventional plastics. Hemp plastic can also be recycled indefinitely. While petroleum-based plastic can be recycled, because this type of plastic is chemical-laden, it is a toxic process. Conventional plastics that are recycled still leak harmful substances into the environment such as BPA.

Plastic made from hemp avoids these toxins completely.

2. Hemp plastic is non-toxic
Plastic is toxic to our health.

Conventional plastics contain endocrine disruptors. Endocrine disruptors, such as BPA, interfere with the endocrine (aka hormone) system in the human body. Once inside the body, endocrine disruptors act like the hormone estrogen.

Why is this dangerous?

This hormonal imbalance in the body can stimulate the development of tumors. In fact, endocrine disruptors are linked to birth defects, cancer, learning disabilities, and more.

The dangers of toxic chemicals from plastic don’t end at digestion. Endocrine disruptors can also leach into the soil and groundwater, devastating the natural environment and our health.

Yet, hemp plastic is non-toxic. Plastic manufactured from hemp doesn’t contain harmful endocrine disruptors like petroleum-based plastics. Nor does it release toxins into the air during production.

Why continue to destroy our environment and health when there is an alternative?

3. Hemp plastic could help save endangered wildlife
Plastic is polluting the ocean at alarming rates.

A study by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization and Imperial College of London found that 60% of seabirds today have plastic in their gut. By 2050, they expect that number could rise to 99%

How does this plastic end up in wildlife?

When plastic is exposed to sunlight, it breaks down into smaller pieces. These small pieces of plastic end up being ingested by marine and other sea life. As plastic disintegrates, it moves down the food chain.

Animals, like humans, are not designed to consume plastic.

Ingesting plastic can lead to a number of detrimental health effects. Many of which we are likely still unaware of.

Hemp plastic, on the other hand, is biodegradable. It is also non-toxic. Instead of filling up our seas with deadly petrochemical plastics, we could create sustainable initiatives to recycle hemp plastic safely.

4. Hemp plastic is extraordinarily versatile
Did you know thousands of everyday plastic products could be made from hemp instead of petroleum? Hemp plastic can be molded into almost any shape. Uses of hemp plastic include:

Electronics
Containers
Toys
Cosmetics
Bottles
Bags
Car Parts
Boats
Furniture
This list is only a fraction of plastic products that could be made from hemp. Hemp plastic can replace toxic plastic products in every way. And unlike petrochemical plastics, manufacturing hemp plastic is environmentally friendly and cost-effective.

5. Hemp plastic decreases environmental pollutants
There is more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere today than at any point in history during the last 80,000 years.

Rising carbon dioxide concentrations are responsible for the warming of the earth’s atmosphere. Otherwise known as the greenhouse effect. Much of this rise in carbon dioxide can be attributed to the burning of fossil fuels.

Conventional plastics are made from fossil fuels like petroleum. Therefore, plastic is a big contributor to rising CO2 emissions.

Hemp plastic and products can actually reduce the greenhouse effect. This is because hemp absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and converts it into oxygen. In addition, hemp plastic generates zero toxic byproducts.

Seed to sale, hemp plastic is a sustainable process. This is the complete opposite from the toxic manufacturing process of petrochemical plastics.

6. Hemp plastic is stronger than petroleum-based plastics
Plastic made from hemp is five times stiffer and 3.5 stronger than polypropylene, one of the most common types of plastic. It is also a lot lighter. This makes hemp unique from other manufacturing materials.

Hemp also doesn’t pose the health risks conventional plastics do.

So not only is hemp plastic stronger, it’s safer. Hemp plastic provides durability and strength while also being lightweight.

These features combined make hemp plastic a no brainer. Why risk health and safety when there is a perfectly suitable alternative?

7. Hemp plastic is a renewable resource
From the moment the seed enters the soil; hemp enriches its environment.

Hemp is a sturdy plant with deep roots. As such, hemp helps prevent soil erosion, thereby reducing water pollution. Hemp can also be cultivated in the same soil for years without jeopardizing quality.

Even once hemp is manufactured into plastic, it continues to be sustainable. Hemp plastic is 100% biodegradable. Which means that under the right conditions it will decompose within a few months. (Unlike traditional plastics that take an indefinite amount of time while leeching toxins in the process.)

Conventional plastics are not worth the risk. The alternative is right in front of us.

No other natural resource offers the capabilities of hemp. Start to finish hemp is renewable. While hemp certainly isn’t the only answer to our environmental and health concerns, it’s a start.

Source : Green Flowers