Hemp Could Free Us From Oil, Prevent Deforestation, Cure Cancer, and It’s Environmentally Friendly

Hemp is a tall, beautiful and gracious looking annual plant that can reach heights over twelve feet – and even that il mattes more than many people know about it.

Fortunately, we’re here with an education to offer you.

Although hemp (cannabis sativa) and marijuana (cannabis sativa var. indica) come from a similar species of plant, they are very different and confusion has been caused by deliberate misinformation with far reaching effects on socioeconomics as well as on environmentars.

The reason hemp is illegal is not because of any negative impact to the environment or human health, but exactly the opposite. It is so environmentally friendly, nutritionally and medicinally beneficial, that it provides too many abundant resources which would make it impossible for powerful corporations to compete.

Historical Use

Hemp is the most universally useful plant we have at our disposal. The history of mankind’s use of hemp can be traced way back in time to between about 5000 – 7000 BC. Remains of seed husks have been found at Neolithic burial sites in central Europe, which indicate that they were used in funeral rites and shamanic ceremonies. It is probable that at that time the distinctions between various strains were not as pronounced as they are today.

Up until and even during WWII, hemp was a widely grown crop, which provided the world with an excellent and most durable source of fibre. Since it is an annual with a growing cycle of only 120 days it can be harvested several times a year, depending on local weather conditions. Its biomass is considerable, which means that it absorbs large quantities of the greenhouse gas CO2.

It is resistant to bugs and requires little agrochemical treatment. It is extremely undemanding and can be grown in very poor conditions and depleted soils and will actually improve the soil structure over a period of years. For many centuries hemp was one of the most important industrial crops which provided the fibres for rope and tough, durable canvass without which the age of exploration could never have set sail.

In the US too, there have long been numerous rules and regulation in place regarding the cultivation of hemp. But unlike today’s regulations that strongly prohibit any cultivation of hemp, less than a century ago hemp cultivation was not just encouraged, but mandatory, with hefty fines being levied against farmers who refused. ‘Hemp for Victory’ was the government coined slogan that fuelled the last big bout of legal hemp cultivation during WWII, promoting hemp cultivation as a patriotic cause.

Source : Truth Command

Hemp fuels- Environmentally friendly fuel sources

The basics: Hemp can provide two types of fuel.

1. Hemp biodiesel – made from the oil of the (pressed) hemp seed.
2. Hemp ethanol/methanol – made from the fermented stalk.

To clarify further, ethanol is made from such things as grains, sugars, starches, waste paper and forest products, and methanol is made from woody/pulp matter. Using processes such as gasification, acid hydrolysis and enzymes, hemp can be used to make both ethanol and methanol.

In this day of oil wars, peak oil (and the accompanying soaring prices), cllimate change and oil spills such as the one in the gulf by BP, it’s more important than ever to promote sustainable alternatives such as hemp ethanol. Hemp turns out to be the most cost-efficient and valuable of all the fuel crops we could grow on a scale that could fuel the world.

And as it turns out, the whole reason for hemp prohibition – and alcohol prohibition – may have been a fuel the realization that OIL production is threatened by any competing fuel source, especially one that requires no modifications to your car!

What is Hemp Biodiesel?
Hemp biodiesel is the name for a variety of ester based oxygenated fuels made from hemp oil. The concept of using vegetable oil as an engine fuel dates back to 1895 when Dr. Rudolf Diesel developed the first diesel engine to run on vegetable oil. Diesel demonstrated his engine at the World Exhibition in Paris in 1900 using peanut oil as fuel. Hemp biodiesel come from the pressing of the hemp seeds to extract the oil. Through a process explained here , hemp biodiesel can be made.

Hemp biodiesel can be made from domestically produced, renewable oilseed crops such as hemp. With over 30 million successful U.S. road miles hemp biodiesel could be the answer to our cry for renewable fuel sources. Learning more about renewable fuels does not mean we should not cut back on consumption but does help address the environmental affects of our choices. There is more to hemp as a renewable fuel source than you know

Why Hemp Biodiesel?

Biodiesel is the only alternative fuel that runs in any conventional, unmodified diesel engine.
It can be stored anywhere that petroleum diesel fuel is stored. Biodiesel is safe to handle and transport because it is as biodegradable as sugar, 10 times less toxic than table salt, and has a high flashpoint of about 300 F compared to petroleum diesel fuel, which has a flash point of 125 F.
Biodiesel can be made from domestically produced, renewable oilseed crops such as hemp.
Biodiesel is a proven fuel with over 30 million successful US road miles, and over 20 years of use in Europe.
When burned in a diesel engine, biodiesel replaces the exhaust odor of petroleum diesel with the pleasant smell of hemp, popcorn or french fries.
Biodiesel is the only alternative fuel in the US to complete EPA Tier I Health Effects Testing under section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act, which provide the most thorough inventory of environmental and human health effects attributes that current technology will allow.
Biodiesel is 11% oxygen by weight and contains no sulfur.
The use of biodiesel can extend the life of diesel engines because it is more lubricating than petroleum diesel fuel, while fuel consumption, auto ignition, power output, and engine torque are relatively unaffected by biodiesel.
The Congressional Budget Office, Department of Defense, US Department of Agriculture, and others have determined that biodiesel is the low cost alternative fuel option for fleets to meet requirements of the Energy Policy Act.
Source : Hemp.com

Hemp offers real sustainable solutions to our earth-killing practices

Hemp, the non-psychoactive strains of the Cannabis family, was once one of the most ubiquitous plants in the world. First found around 8,000 BCE in central Asia, hemp spread across multiple continents through the ages and was a fundamental part of the agricultural revolution. Throughout several civilizations, hemp was used for food, textiles, oil, and industrial purposes. Yet, after getting confused with marijuana in the 1900s, hemp was soon outlawed and forgotten. Many of its benefits were lost in the modern world.

Popular Mechanics published an article back in 1941 with findings that hemp “can be used to produce more than 25,000 products”. In several other countries, hemp has continued to be used for food, textiles, and even in construction to build houses that are more energy efficient than regular buildings.
popular mechanics hemp billion dollar crop

Hemp can help our Farmers and the Planet
The best part of hemp is that its applications are completely eco-friendly and sustainable.

Farmers can actually restore the health of their farmland by planting hemp as it eliminates the need to use agrochemicals such as herbicides or pesticides. Since hemp grows so densely and its roots are so deep, it kills off weeds naturally.

Planting hemp can offer an alternative solution to many of our current practices that are damaging this planet. With a growing cycle of only 4–6 months, hemp is a more sustainable option than trees for paper. Anything you can make out of fossil fuel, you can make out of hemp. This includes energy, plastic, or any other petroleum based products.
hemp’s diverse applications

Hemp has too many applications for us to ignore, especially as we fight an uphill battle against climate change. Bringing hemp back could be key to our sustainability efforts in preserving our soil and natural resources. Developing different applications of hemp and spreading it to the mainstream will help increase the supply of hemp and jumpstart a shift to a healthier society.

It’s time for us to take another look at hemp
We encourage you to learn more about the benefits and uses of hemp by getting involved with hemp events in your city. This is a fantastic way to meet hemp enthusiasts in your community, while helping to grow hemp awareness.

You can also support the hemp movement by writing to your legislators. Ask them to support the Industrial Hemp Farming Act to allow our farmers to grow this crop. Zev Paiss, the founder of the National Hemp Association, claims “The Industrial Hemp Farming Act could be the largest jobs bill that Congress can pass in 2016”.

Source : Ministry of Hemp